NOTICE This material may be protected by Copyright Law (Title 17 U.

It is an essay of sociology class. There are some misspelled words and grammar mistakes. Please correct and modify them, and

then finish the essay perfectly.

You can consult Goffman’s Asylums and documentary film Titicut Follies which will be found in the youtube. I attached everything

you will need

Attachment 1

Attachment 2

Attachment 3

ATTACHMENT PREVIEW

Download attachment

View the Answer

Show entire document

ATTACHMENT PREVIEW

Download attachment

Goffman asylums
“Asylums” by erving Goffman, is a collction of Essays based upon Social Situation of
Mental Patients and Other Inmates. Essays are portrayal of the mental illness of the mental
patients who have lost their mental growth and humanistic approach and also their pattern of
interaction. So these essay makes an effort how to improve mental growth of these patients. He
placed all his reaseraches and paers in a book called”total Institutions”. In his book “Goffman”
analysed there should be a need of special schools for the people who require special atteintion
care and needs.
In his book “Total Institutions” Goffman describes about the various stages of “moral
career” of mental patients. The main perspective of the goffman was based upon the
encompassing and totalizing, and as “symbolized by the barrier to social intercourse with the
outside and to departure that is often built right into the physical plant, such as locked doors,
high walls, barbed wire, cliffs, water, forests, or moors” (p. 4), but for their studiy and
research program perspective several universities and colleges cannot be considered for the
total institutions.
Though while making the study paper and reaserches realted with mental career it has
been signified that there would be lot of variation between the mental status of students of
graduate school and a mental hospital.
However, goffman analyzed various stages and
charecterstics of the mental health and the illness of the.
However, as Goffman sought to do, analysis of the stages through which mental patients
change their conception of self and of others can help us to see parallel effects on the self

View the Answer

between the social arrangements in a total institution and the social arrangements in a civilian
institution.
While the pre-patient phase of an inmate’s moral career involves multi-agent-assisted
sequences of passing from being a person to being a patient, the pre-admission graduate
student is expected to have gone through a series of independent thinking and decision-
making regarding the graduate program he/she applies to. However, the inmate and the
graduate student face similar threats to the self in admission procedures where the criteria
used to assess the applicant may have more to do with the goals of the institution than with
the personal goals of the patient or the graduate applicant. After admission, both patient and
the graduate student face similar pressures to conform to the institutional goals by which they
were admitted in the first place. After admission, the graduate student, just like the new
mental patient, is supposed to be better prepared for learning if he/she is first stripped of any
intellectual baggage, arrogance or muddle-headedness. The student is exposed to possible
humiliations to self. Some students learn to mortify their selves and do whatever is prescribed
to get their graduate degree, however boring and numbing that could be. Some find the
strength and the creativity to open their selves to the instruction of others and to structural
constraints and still feel in control of their graduate education. Some fall by the wayside and it
is this last group who would feel compelled to construct a “sad tale” of their failure in order to
show that they are not responsible for their failure.
Goffman describes the mortification of the self in total institutions in relation to a concept of
self that has more room to define itself within the relatively stable social arrangements in an
inmate’s world prior to entering a total institution. The mortification of the self involves the
processes by which this “civilian self” is slowly stripped of its connections to the outside

Show entire document

ATTACHMENT PREVIEW

Download attachment

Written Assignment: Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Your essay should be typed (double spaced) and checked for wording, punctuation and form.
-When you cite ideas from class readings, be sure to include page numbers.
If you use any outside sources, be sure to include the citation(s), that is, footnotes and a
bibliography.
(See statement about plagiarism in our Sakai site where I have provided web links that can
help with citation formatting.)
3. Grade: Total 100 points
– Understanding the theories (40 points)
– Application of the theories to the empirical reality (40 points)
– Written form. Is the essay written in a clear, convincing, and concise manner? Are citations
accurate? (20 points)
4. Tip: Make sure that your paper is in essay form. (If you choose option one below, do not simply answer
the questions I have provided one after the other.)
In grading, I look for an understanding of the material, ability to apply the theories to the empirical reality,
and reasonable effort to present your ideas clearly, convincingly, and concisely.
Choose one of the following options:
Option 1
.
Write a 3-4 page essay relating Goffman’s “Asylums” (assigned on our syllabus 11/4) to the
documentary film
Titicut Follies
(1967). This film will be shown in class on Novermber 4. It is available
through the RU library system.
Question: In what specific ways
does this documentary support Goffman’s perspective on Total Institutions?
Are there any ways that it does not support his ideas?
Here are some probable questions you may ask in your essay. (You don’t have to answer all these
questions!) You may decide to focus your essay/analysis on one question.
1) According to Goffman, what is a total institution? What purpose does it actually serve?
2) What typical characteristics of inmate-staff relations suggested by Goffman were salient in the prison
hospital at Bridge Water in the film
Titicut Follies
? To what extent do the staff control the inmates and how?
3) How adequately does Goffman’s concept of the “mortification of the self” or “curtailment of the self”
explain the practices and treatments of the inmates shown in the film? How is the self depersonalized?
4) How does the process of “moral loosening” or “moral fatigue” (p.223-224) operate in the inmates’
reactions shown in the film
Titicut Follies
? Did you identify any practice of “secondary adjustments,”
through which the inmates are able to circumvent the control of the staff?
5) Compare the strength and the weakness of Goffman’s sociological (participant) observation and
Wiseman’s documentary filming as a method of revealing “empirical reality.”

View the Answer